sea change

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Shakespeare's The Tempest, 1, ii.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sea change (plural sea changes)

  1. (idiomatic) A profound transformation.
    Public opinion has undergone a sea change since the 2002 elections.
    • c.1610-1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 2,
      Full fathom five thy father lies: / Of his bones are coral made: / Those are pearls that were his eyes: / Nothing of him that doth fade / But doth suffer a sea-change / Into something rich and strange.
    • 1910, Jack London, Theft: A Play In Four Acts, Actors' Description of Characters,
      Anthony Starkweather. [] Essentially a moral man, his rigid New England morality has suffered a sea change and developed into the morality of the master-man of affairs, equally rigid, equally uncompromising, but essentially Jesuitical in that he believes in doing wrong that right may come of it.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sea change" (World Wide Words)
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 13:00