Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 18:02

simper

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain; compare (probably from[1]) Danish simper / semper (coy), German zimper (elegant, dainty).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

simper (third-person singular simple present simpers, present participle simpering, simple past and past participle simpered)

  1. (intransitive) To smile in a foolish, frivolous, self-conscious, coy, or smug manner.
    • 1892, Mark Twain, The American Claimant, ch. 21:
      Why, look at him—look at this simpering self-righteous mug!
    • 1915, Harold MacGrath, The Voice In The Fog, ch. 24:
      How the fools kotowed and simpered while I looked over their jewels and speculated upon how much I could get for them!
  2. (obsolete) To glimmer; to twinkle.
    • Herbert
      Yet can I mark how stars above / Simper and shine.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

simper (plural simpers)

  1. A foolish, frivolous, self-conscious, or affected smile; a smirk.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, Book 2, Ch. 2, "St. Edmundsbury":
      Yes, another world it was, when these black ruins, white in their new mortar and fresh chiselling, first saw the sun as walls, long ago. Gauge not, with thy dilettante compasses, with that placid dilettante simper, the Heaven's—Watchtower of our Fathers, the fallen God's—Houses, the Golgotha of true Souls departed!
    • 1972, Eric Ambler, The Levanter (2009 edition), ISBN 9780755117635, p. 158:
      He paused, and then a strange expression appeared on his lips. It was very like a simper.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ simper in Online Etymology dictionary

AnagramsEdit