sioun

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sion and cion, ciun, chion; ultimately of Germanic origin.[1]

NounEdit

sioun (plural siouns or siounes)

  1. scion
    1. offshoot[1]
      • circa 1300–1305: Land Cokaygne, page 74
        In þe praer is a tre … Þe rote is gingeuir and galingale, Þe siouns beþ al sedwale.
      • circa 1380: John Wycliffe, Select English works, book 1, page 166
        As a sioun mai not bere fruyt but if it stonde stable in þe vyne.
      • 1382–1388: John Wycliffe; The Holy Bible, made from the Latin Vulgate by John Wycliffe and his followers; first edition (1382), Ezekiel 17:6{1}; second edition (1388), Numbers 13:24{2} and Jeremiah 5:10{3}
        {1} Þe sed … is mad in to a vineȝerd & made frut in to siounes [L palmites].
        {2} Thei ȝeden til to the stronde of clustre and kittiden doun a sioun with his grape, which twei men baren in a barre.
        {3} Do ȝe awei the siouns therof, for thei ben not seruauntis of the Lord.
    2. descendant[1]

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 sioun” listed on page 943 of the Middle English Dictionary by Robert E. Lewis and John Reidy (1988, University of Michigan Press, ISBN 9780472011988)
Last modified on 2 January 2012, at 21:16