Last modified on 30 November 2014, at 00:02

descendant

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dessendaunte, from Middle French, from Latin dēscendēns, present participle of descendere, from + scandere (to climb, ascend).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

descendant (not comparable)

  1. descending from a biological ancestor.
  2. proceeding from a figurative ancestor or source.

Usage notesEdit

The adjective may be spelled either with ant or ent as the final syllable (see descendent). The noun may be spelled only with ant.

Alternative formsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

descendant (plural descendants)

  1. (literally) One who is the progeny a specified person, at any distance of time or through any number of generations.
    The patriarch survived many descendants: five children, a dozen grandchildren, even a great grandchild.
  2. (figuratively) A thing that derives directly from a given precursor or source.
    This famous medieval manuscript has many descendants.
  3. (biology) A later evolutionary type.
    Dogs evolved as descendants of early wolves.
  4. (linguistics) A language that is descended from another.
    English and Scots are the descendants of Old English.
  5. (linguistics) A word or form in one language that is descended from a counterpart in an ancestor language.
    • 1993, Jens Elmegård Rasmussen, “The Slavic i-verbs with an excursus on the Indo-European ē-verbs”, in Bela Brogyanyi and Reiner Lipp (editors), Comparative-Historical Linguistics, John Benjamins Publishing, ISBN 978-90-272-3598-5, page 479:
      The direct descendant of this form is the Slavic aorist: Sb.-Cr. nȍsī, dȍnosī.

Usage notesEdit

The adjective may be spelled either with ant or ent as the final syllable (see descendent). The noun may be spelled only with ant.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēscendēns, the present participle of descendere, itself from + scandere (climb, ascend).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

descendant

  1. Present participle of descendre.

NounEdit

descendant m (plural descendants, feminine descendante)

  1. A descendant; one who is the progeny of someone at any distance of time; e.g. a child; a grandchild, etc.

AntonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

descendant m (feminine descendante, masculine plural descendants, feminine plural descendantes)

  1. (which is) descending.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dēscendant

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of dēscendō