Last modified on 28 August 2013, at 16:54

spang

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English spang (a small piece of ornamental metal; spangle; small ornament; a bowl or cup), likely from Middle Dutch spange (buckle, clasp) or Old English spang (buckle, clasp)

NounEdit

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (obsolete) A shiny ornament or object; a spangle
    • Spenser
      With glittering spangs that did like stars appear.

VerbEdit

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. To set with bright points: star or spangle.
  2. To hitch; fasten.

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeia

VerbEdit

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. (intransitive, of a flying object such as a bullet) To strike or ricochet with a loud report

AdverbEdit

spang (not comparable)

  1. (dated) Suddenly; slap, smack.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 22:
      And I didn't stop until I found myself spang in the middle of the Musée de Cluny, clutching the rack.

Etymology 3Edit

Probably from spring (verb) or spank (verb)

VerbEdit

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. (intransitive, dialect, UK, Scotland) To leap; spring.
    • Ramsay
      But when they spang o'er reason's fence, / We smart for't at our own expense.
  2. (transitive, dialect, UK, Scotland) To cause to spring; set forcibly in motion; throw with violence.

NounEdit

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (Scotland) A bound or spring; a leap.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

See span

NounEdit

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (Scotland) A span.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit