stoutish

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

stout +‎ -ish

AdjectiveEdit

stoutish (not comparable)

  1. reasonably stout, somewhat stout
    • 1912, Margaret Burnham, The Girl Aviators' Motor Butterfly[1]:
      Descending to the office to buy some postcards, the boys found, lounging about the desk, a stoutish man with a rather dissipated face, puffy under the eyes and heavy about the jaws.
    • 1911, H. G. Wells, The Country of the Blind, And Other Stories[2]:
      I joined all my fishing-lines together with stems of seaweed and things, and made a stoutish string, perhaps twelve yards in length or more, and I fastened two lumps of coral rock to the ends of this.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island[3]:
      In the meantime the captain, whom I had observed to be wonderfully swollen about the chest and pockets, had turned out a great many various stores--the British colours, a Bible, a coil of stoutish rope, pen, ink, the log-book, and pounds of tobacco.
Last modified on 10 February 2013, at 10:52