suck in

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

suck in (third-person singular simple present sucks in, present participle sucking in, simple past and past participle sucked in)

  1. (idiomatic) To cause someone to become slowly more and more involved in a business or situation that is often not to that person's liking.
    I really didn't want to be on the committee, but somehow I got sucked in.
  2. (idiomatic) To contract one's abdominal muscles to make one's stomach look flatter.
    I sucked in my belly, hoping to hide the extra weight I had put on over the holidays.

Usage notesEdit

  • When used in the sense "to cause someone to become involved in a situation", it is usually in the passive; one is sucked in by the situation.

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 19 June 2013, at 23:26