Last modified on 4 October 2014, at 01:27

cause

See also: 'cause, causé, and causé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cause, from Old French cause (a cause, a thing), from Latin causa (reason, sake, cause), in Medieval Latin also "a thing". Origin uncertain. See accuse, excuse. Displaced native Middle English sake (cause, reason) (from Old English sacu (cause)), Middle English andweorc, andwork (matter, cause) (from Old English andweorc (matter, thing, cause)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cause (plural causes)

  1. The source of, or reason for, an event or action; that which produces or effects a result.
    Her wedding will be cause for celebration.
    They identified a burst pipe as the cause of the flooding.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights, […], the height and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its strength—all these things seemed to have their part as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his thoughts.
  2. A goal, aim or principle, especially one which transcends purely selfish ends.
    • Shakespeare
      God befriend us, as our cause is just.
    • Burke
      The part they take against me is from zeal to the cause.
  3. (obsolete) Sake; interest; advantage.
    • Bible, 2 Corinthians vii. 12
      I did it not for his cause.
  4. (obsolete) Any subject of discussion or debate; a matter; an affair.
    • Shakespeare
      What counsel give you in this weighty cause?
  5. (law) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

cause (third-person singular simple present causes, present participle causing, simple past and past participle caused)

  1. To set off an event or action.
    The lightning caused thunder.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter 1, The Purchase Price:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. [] She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, drawing a deep breath which caused the round of her bosom to lift the lace at her throat.
    • 2013 June 1, “A better waterworks”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 5 (Technology Quarterly): 
      An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic [] real kidneys [] . But they are nothing like as efficient, and can cause bleeding, clotting and infection—not to mention inconvenience for patients, who typically need to be hooked up to one three times a week for hours at a time.
  2. To actively produce as a result, by means of force or authority.
    His dogged determination caused the fundraising to be successful.
    • Bible, Genesis vii. 4
      I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them. Soft heartedness caused more harm than good.
  3. To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

cause

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of causar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of causar

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from classical Latin causa. Compare chose.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cause f (plural causes)

  1. cause
  2. case (a legal proceeding)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

cause

  1. first-person singular present indicative of causer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of causer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of causer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of causer
  5. second-person singular imperative of causer

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

cause f pl

  1. plural form of causa

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin causa.

NounEdit

cause f (plural causes)

  1. (law) case

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French cause.

NounEdit

cause (plural causes)

  1. cause

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

cause

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of causar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of causar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of causar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of causar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

cause

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of causar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of causar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of causar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of causar.