telekinesis

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tele- +‎ -kinesis.

NounEdit

telekinesis (countable and uncountable, plural telekineses)

  1. (uncountable) The ability to move objects with the power of one's mind.
    • 1899, Thomson Jay Hudson, The Divine Pedigree of Man, page 154:
      Telekinetic energy, which has been variously designated as psychic force (Sir William Crookes), ectenic force (Professor Thury), and telekinesis (Professor Cowes), is demonstrably a power or faculty of the subjective mind.
    • 1920, Hereward Carrington, The Physical Phenomena of Spiritualism, page 367:
      And this brings me to a consideration of how the phenomena of telekinesis may conceivably be produced — granting that the phenomena are ever genuine at all.
    • 1988, Robert Salvatore, The Crystal Shard, page 39:
      'Venison' he declared, mentally lifting the animal through the air toward him without a second thought to the act, though telekinesis was a spell that hadn't been in the considerable repertoire of Morkai the Red.
    • 2000, Fred M. Frohock, Lives of the Psychics: The Shared Worlds of Science and Mysticism‎, page 29:
      She regards telekinesis as impossible and claims for it as generally fraudulent. For two years she worked in a university laboratory testing telekinesis,
    • 2002, Rita Berkowtiz; Deborah S. Romaine, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Communicating with Spirits‎, page 187:
      Perhaps the most famous demonstrations of telekinesis came in the 1970s when a young psychic from Russia named Uri Geller came to prominence for his ability to bend spoons and other metal objects without any physical contact.
    • 2006, Richard Cadena, Automated Lighting, page 434:
      And if voice-activated control isn't enough, we could someday use telekinesis to control lights with our thoughts.
  2. An instance of use of such power.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 10 January 2014, at 18:04