Last modified on 18 June 2013, at 12:04

topside

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

topside (plural topsides)

  1. The side or part of something that is at the top.
    • 1964 March 12, C. D. Watkins, Reaching the upper ionosphere by radar, New Scientist, page 686,
      Yet the topside exerts significant control over the lower ionosphere and hence also has an indirect effect on long-range radio comunications.
    • 1990, Kenneth Davies, Ionospheric Radio, page 261,
      These sounders have produced a wealth of information not only about the distribution of electrons in the topside but also about the response of plasma when the transmitter is embedded in it.
    • 2006, Bharat Bhushan (editor), Springer, Handbook of Nanotechnology, Volume 2, page 1617,
      The rotor underside also exhibits a higher coefficient of microscale friction than the rotor topside and stator, as shown in Table 50.6.
    • 2008, Shan-Ben Chen, Jing Wu, Intelligentized Methodology for Arc Welding Dynamical Processes, Springer, page 40,
      The composite filter system includes topside and backside light path with different filter[s]. The topside image of [the] weld pool is formed by the illumination from arc emission in the spectral window of 100-200 nm.
    • 2008, Carol Fenster, 1,000 Gluten-Free Recipes, page 480,
      Place one cake layer on a serving plate, topside down; spread evenly with the pineapple filling. Top with the second cake layer, topside up.
  2. (nautical) The surface of a ship’s hull that is above the water line.
    • 1978, US General Accounting Office, Decisions of the Comptroller General of the United States, Issue 58, page 793,
      We believe that the failure of Sun Ship to submit a bid for topside work had no effect on the price, quality, quantity or time of performance of any contract to be awarded for the combination of drydock and topside work covered in the firm′s bid for Lot III.
  3. (construction) The structure and assembly of modules above the jacket or gravity base sub structure.
    • 1997, P. J. Dowling, B. A. Burgan, Steel structures in the new millennium, P. K. K. Lee (editor), Structures in the New Millennium, page 11,
      Future plans are for tripod designs in up to 90m of water, supporting lightweight topsides and braced mono towers for marginal field developments.
  4. (construction) The structure and assembly of modules on the deck of any floating installation.
  5. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) The outer side of a round of beef.
    • 2004, Z. Farah, A. Fischer (editors), Milk and Meat from the Camel: Handbook on Products and Processing, page 116,
      To detach the round bone, the biggest muscle of the round, the topside, must first be removed. This is done by cutting down to the round bone in a layer of connective tissue which separates the topside from the nuggle.
    • 2008, Leanne Kitchen, The Butcher, Murdoch Books, page 27,
      Slow roasting is better for lean or not so tender cuts such as topside or whole bolar blade, which are not suitable to be cooked very pink.
    • 2012, Graham Dodgshun, Michel Peters, David O′Dea, Cambridge University Press, 6th Edition, Cookery for the Hospitality Industry, page 384,
      It is removed from its attachment to the silverside along the natural seam, and from the topside by a straight cut along the line of the femur bone.

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

topside (not comparable)

  1. (nautical) Above decks, such as on the weather deck or bridge.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit