Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:23
See also: sìde and Side

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English side, syde, syd, from Old English sīd (wide, broad, spacious, ample, extensive, vast, far-reaching), from Proto-Germanic *sīdaz (drooping, hanging, low, excessive, extra), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit). Cognate with Low German sied (low), Swedish sid (long, hanging down), Icelandic síður (low hanging, long).

AdjectiveEdit

side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

  1. Being on the side, or toward the side; lateral.
    • Dryden
      One mighty squadron with a side wind sped.
  2. Indirect; oblique; incidental.
    a side issue; a side view or remark
    • Hooker
      The law hath no side respect to their persons.
  3. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.
    • Laneham
      His gown had side sleeves down to mid leg.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  4. (Scotland) Far; distant.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English side, syde, from Old English sīde (widely, extensively, amply). See above.

AdverbEdit

side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

  1. (UK dialectal) Widely; wide; far.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English side, from Old English sīde (side, flank), from Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ (side, flank, edge, shore), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit). Cognate with West Frisian side (side), Dutch zijde, zij (side), German Seite (side), Danish side (side), Swedish sida (side).

NounEdit

side (plural sides)

  1. A bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape.
    A square has four sides.
  2. A flat surface of a three-dimensional object; a face.
    A cube has six sides.
  3. One half (left or right, top or bottom, front or back, etc.) of something or someone.
    Which side of the tray shall I put it on?
    The patient was bleeding on the right side.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. [] As we reached the lodge we heard the whistle, and we backed up against one side of the platform as the train pulled up at the other.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.
  4. A region in a specified position with respect to something.
    Meet me on the north side of the monument.
  5. One surface of a sheet of paper (used instead of "page", which can mean one or both surfaces.)
    John wrote 15 sides for his essay!
  6. One possible aspect of a concept, person or thing.
    Look on the bright side.
  7. One set of competitors in a game.
    Which side has kick-off?
  8. (UK, Australia, Ireland) A sports team.
    • 1988, Ken Jones, Soccer skills & tactics, page 9:
      Newly promoted, they were top of the First Division and unbeaten when they took on a Manchester United side that had been revitalized by a new manager, []
    • 2011 September 28, Jon Smith, “Valencia 1-1 Chelsea”, BBC Sport:
      It was no less than Valencia deserved after dominating possession in the final 20 minutes although Chelsea defended resolutely and restricted the Spanish side to shooting from long range.
    • 2011, Nick Cain, Greg Growden, Rugby Union For Dummies, UK Edition, 3rd Edition, page 220,
      Initially, the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish unions refused to send national sides, preferring instead to send touring sides like the Barbarians, the Penguins, the Co-Optimists, the Wolfhounds, Crawshays Welsh, and the Public School Wanderers.
  9. A group having a particular allegiance in a conflict or competition.
    In the second world war, the Italians were on the side of the Germans.
    • Landor
      We have not always been of the [] same side in politics.
    • Alexander Pope
      sets the passions on the side of truth
  10. (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) Sidespin; english
    He had to put a bit of side on to hit the pink ball.
  11. (UK, Australia, Ireland, dated) A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being watched (from when there were only two channels).
    I just want to see what's on the other side — James said there was a good film on tonight.
  12. (US, colloquial) A dish that accompanies the main course; a side dish.
    Do you want a side of cole-slaw with that?
  13. A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
    • Milton
      To sit upon thy father David's throne, / By mother's side thy father.
SynonymsEdit
  • (bounding straight edge of an object): edge
  • (flat surface of an object): face
  • (left or right half): half
  • (surface of a sheet of paper): page
  • (region in a specified position with respect to something):
  • (one possible aspect of a concept):
  • (set of opponents in a game): team
  • (group having a particular allegiance in a war):
  • (television channel): channel, station (US)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

side (third-person singular simple present sides, present participle siding, simple past and past participle sided)

  1. (intransitive) To ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with"
    Which will you side with, good or evil?
    • 1597, Francis Bacon, Essays – "Of Great Place":
      All rising to great place is by a winding star; and if there be factions, it is good to side a man's self, whilst he is in the rising, and to balance himself when he is placed.
    • Alexander Pope
      All side in parties, and begin the attack.
    • 1958, Archer Fullingim, The Kountze [Texas] News, August 28, 1958:
      How does it feel... to... side in with those who voted against you in 1947?
  2. To lean on one side.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
    • Spenser
      His blind eye that sided Paridell.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To suit; to pair; to match.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Clarendon to this entry?)
  5. (transitive, shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
  6. (transitive) To furnish with a siding.
    to side a house
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

(index si)

EtymologyEdit

Formed from the root of the verb sitoa with the suffix -e.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈside̞(ʔ)]
  • Hyphenation: si‧de

NounEdit

side

  1. bandage
  2. bond
  3. sanitary towel
  4. (anatomy) ligament

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

sīde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of sīdō

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish saiget, from Latin sagitta.

NounEdit

side f (genitive sidey, plural sideyn)

  1. arrow, bolt, shaft

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
side hide
after "yn", tide
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Related termsEdit


Middle IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish síd

NounEdit

side m

  1. a fairy hill or mound
  2. (in plural) = áes side (people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1]

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse síða.

NounEdit

side m, f (definite singular sida or siden, indefinite plural sider, definite plural sidene)

  1. a page (e.g. in a book)
  2. side
    på høyre side - on the right-hand side
  3. (of a case) aspect
  4. (on animal) flank

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse síða.

NounEdit

side f (definite singular sida, indefinite plural sider, definite plural sidene)

  1. a page (e.g. in a book)
    ei bok på 300 sider - a book of 300 pages
  2. side

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the adjective sīd

AdverbEdit

sīde

  1. widely

Etymology 2Edit

Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ, whence also Old High German sīta

NounEdit

sīde f

  1. side