trotter

See also: Trotter

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

trot +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trotter (plural trotters)

  1. A horse trained for harness racingW.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.
  2. The foot of a pig or sheep.
    • 1945, George Orwell, Animal Farm, chapter 6
      Finally Napoleon raised his trotter for silence and announced that he had already made all the arrangements.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French trotter, from Old French trotter, troter (to go, trot), from Medieval Latin *trottāre, *trotāre (to go), from Frankish *trottōn (to go, run), from Proto-Germanic *trudōną, *trudaną, *tradjaną (to go, step, tread), from Proto-Indo-European *dreu-, *derə-, *drā- (to run, escape). Cognates: see English trot. More at tread.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trotter

  1. (usually of a horse) to trot

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 04:37