waitron

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Coined as a gender-neutral substitute for waiter and waitress, apparently by analogy with patron.

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

waitron (plural waitrons)

  1. (nonstandard, gender-neutral) A waiter.
    • 1992 April 24, Julian May, Jack the Bodiless, Knopf, ISBN 9780679409502, OL 1567595M:
      With adolescent perversity, he turned up his nose at all of the elegant French items on the Closerie's menu and scandalized the waitron by demanding corned-beef hash—fried extra crisp—with poached eggs, a slice of fresh papaya with lime, banana-walnut bread, and a pitcher of Mexican chocolate.
    • 2004 September 28, Tracey Dalton, The Food and Beverage Handbook, Lansdowne: Juta and Company Ltd., ISBN 9780702166396, OL 7774255M, page 48:
      Table Service is the combined interaction between the guest and the waitron whilst seated at a table in the establishment's restaurant.
    • 2008 February 1, Jenny Ratcliffe-Wright, Spit Or Swallow: A Guide for the Wine Virgin, Lansdowne: Double Storey, ISBN 9781770130616, OL 25421828M, page 89:
      If your wine waitron smells the cork, s/he's probably a beginner at this game because you can tell absolutely nothing by smelling the cork.
    • 2010 May 10, Cowen, Sam, “Jo'burg and London, relatively speaking”, Daily Telegraph, ISSN 0307-1235:
      Come back here with your cut glass, posh English accent and waitrons everywhere will melt at your feet.
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see the citations page.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From waiter +‎ -tron.

NounEdit

waitron (plural waitrons)

  1. (dated, science fiction) A robotic or mechanical waiter.
Last modified on 13 December 2013, at 03:25