Last modified on 22 October 2014, at 11:46

patron

See also: patrón

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old French patron, from Latin patrōnus, derived from pater (father).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patron (plural patrons)

  1. One who protects or supports; a defender.
    • Shakespeare
      patron of my life and liberty
    • Spenser
      the patron of true holiness
  2. A customer.
    This car park is for patrons only.
  3. A property owner who hires a contractor for construction works.
  4. An influential, wealthy person who supported an artist, craftsman, a scholar or a noble.
  5. (historical, Roman antiquity) A master who had freed his slave but still retained some paternal rights over him.
  6. An advocate or pleader.
    • Macaulay
      Let him who works the client wrong / Beware the patron's ire.
  7. (UK, ecclestiastical) One who has gift and disposition of a benefice.
  8. (nautical) A padrone.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

patron (third-person singular simple present patrons, present participle patroning, simple past and past participle patroned)

  1. (obsolete) To be a patron of; to patronize; to favour.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Thomas Browne to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

patron (plural patrons)

  1. (uncommon) patron; wealthy person who supports an artist, craftsman, a scholar, etc.
  2. (uncommon, Roman catholicism) patron saint
  3. (uncommon, Roman antiquity) patron

SynonymsEdit


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

patron

  1. accusative singular of patro

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin patrōnus, from pater (father).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patron m (plural patrons)

  1. boss, employer
    Mon patron m'a accordé quelques jours de vacances supplémentaires.
  2. (sewing and knitting) pattern

Usage notesEdit

This a false friend, the only English sense of this word shared in French is saint patron ("patron saint").

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


HiligaynonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Spanish patrón.

NounEdit

patrón

  1. patron saint

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French.

NounEdit

patron m (invariable)

  1. patron (of a sports event etc)
  2. pattern (paper, for knitting)

AnagramsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin patrōnus, from pater (father).

NounEdit

patron m (plural patrons)

  1. (sewing and knitting) pattern

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pǎtroːn/
  • Hyphenation: pat‧ron

NounEdit

pàtrōn m (Cyrillic spelling па̀тро̄н)

  1. patron
  2. protector

DeclensionEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French patron.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patron (definite accusative patronu, plural patronlar)

  1. boss

DeclensionEdit