Last modified on 20 August 2013, at 12:02

whip off

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

whip off (third-person singular simple present whips off, present participle whipping off, simple past and past participle whipped off)

  1. (transitive) To remove something (especially an item of clothing) with a swift movement.
    • 1773, Oliver Goldsmith, She Stoops to Conquer
      If you but assist me, I'll engage to whip her off to France, and you shall never hear more of her.
    • 2004, Martin Finn, Cocktocock: Tales of Greece
      In an instant he had whipped off his shorts. He lay there showing off his long, slender uncut tool. His balls loose and hairy slipped between his legs. His crotch hair was nearly as blond as his head hair...
    • 1920, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Flappers and Philosophers, Dalyrimple Goes Wrong, chapter 3
      With a furious energy he jumped from the fence, whipped off his coat, and from its black lining cut with his knife a piece about five inches square.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Chapter 15
      (Kitty unpins her hat and sets it down calmly, patting her henna hair. And a prettier, a daintier head of winsome curls was never seen on a whore's shoulders. Lynch puts on her hat. She whips it off.)

TranslationsEdit