Last modified on 20 May 2014, at 00:55

swift

See also: Swift and SWIFT

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old English swift (swift, quick), from Proto-Germanic *swiftaz (swift, quick), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)weip-, *(s)weib- (to twist, wind around). Cognate with Icelandic svipta (to pull quickly), Old English swīfan (to revolve, sweep, wend, intervene). More at swivel.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

swift (comparative swifter, superlative swiftest)

  1. fast; quick; rapid.
    • 2011 November 12, “International friendly: England 1-0 Spain”, BBC Sport:
      Spain were provoked into a response and Villa almost provided a swift equaliser when he rounded Hart but found the angle too acute and could only hit the side-netting.
  2. Capable of moving at high speeds.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

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swift (plural swifts)

  1. (obsolete) The current of a stream.
  2. A small plain-colored bird of the family Apodidae that resembles a swallow and is noted for its rapid flight. Other commom names for the birds of this family include swiftlet, needletail and spinetail.
  3. Some lizards of the genus Sceloporus.
  4. A moth of the family Hepialidae, swift moth, ghost moth.
    • 2013 May-June, William E. Conner, “An Acoustic Arms Race”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 206-7: 
      Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.

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AdverbEdit

swift (comparative more swift, superlative most swift)

  1. (obsolete, poetic) Swiftly.

SynonymsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb swīfan

AdjectiveEdit

swift

  1. swift

DescendantsEdit