Last modified on 22 October 2014, at 12:38

yada yada yada

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

American,[1] origin unclear, perhaps onomatopoeic of blather; perhaps adaptation of dialectal speech, perhaps from yatata or yatter.[2] Various variant forms appear in the US 1940s–60s; for example, the 1947 American musical Allegro by Oscar Hammerstein II and Richard Rodgers contains a song called “Yatata, Yatata, Yatata,” about cocktail party chatter; see talk page for additional citations.

Popularized in the United States in the late 1990s by TV show Seinfeld, where it appears as a catchphrase, initially in Season 8, Episode 19, entitled “The Yada Yada”, originally aired on April 24, 1997, which centers around the phrase (in the duplicative “yada yada” form).[3]

Sometimes popularly attributed to Yiddish, but this is dismissed by etymologists. It is perhaps derived from the Norwegian expression "Jada, Jada" which has a similar interpretation.

Alternative formsEdit

  • yada, yada, yada
  • yadda yadda yadda
  • yadda, yadda, yadda

PhraseEdit

yada yada yada (or yada, yada, yada)

  1. And so on; and so forth.
  2. (less commonly): blah blah blah.

Usage notesEdit

Normally used mid-sentence.

They’re no good, the lot of them—Yaddeyahdah—They're animals! —Lenny Bruce

SynonymsEdit

QuotationsEdit

  • 1981, The Washington Post, January 5th, 1981, page B1:
    I’m talking country codes, asbestos firewalls, yada yada yada.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ OED
  2. ^ yada yada yada” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online
  3. ^ On this date, Seinfeld made “Yada Yada Yada” a catchphrase (but didn’t coin it), This Day in Quotes, April 24, 2010