Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *oβnus. The ó is unexpected, since fricative-induced compensatory lengthening did not occur, as no fricative was deleted. Thurneysen explained the long ó as being transferred from the synonym úath (fear) before that word underwent diphthongization.[1] Forms with the expected short vowel like omun are also attested and are completely interchangeable with the long-vowel forms, even within a single Old Irish speaker's writings.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ómun m

  1. fear
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 59a18
      .i. ómun epertae nad·rabae remdéicsiu Dǽ dim-so intan do·rata form inna fochaidi.
      i.e. fear of saying that there was no providence of God for me, when the tribulations were inflicted upon me.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 128d7
      .i. ermitiu feid homno
      i.e. reverence of the fear of God (explaining Latin reverentia (reverence))

Inflection edit

Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ómun ómunL ómnae
Vocative ómun ómunL ómnu
Accusative ómunN ómunL ómnu
Genitive ómnoH, ómnaH ómno, ómna ómnaeN
Dative ómunL ómnaib ómnaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants edit

  • Middle Irish: úaman, oman

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ómun unchanged n-ómun
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2003), D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, § 61

Further reading edit