English

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Etymology

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Blend of Brexit +‎ regret.

Noun

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Bregret (countable and uncountable, plural Bregrets)

  1. (neologism) Regret about Brexit (or voting in favour of Brexit).
    • 2016 June 25, Lizzie Dearden, “Anger over 'Bregret' as Leave voters say they thought UK would stay in EU”, in The Independent[1]:
      The anxiety – dubbed “Bregret” – emerged as the value of the pound tumbled and markets crashed, while [some felt] betrayed by Nigel Farage’s admission that a Vote Leave poster pledging to spend millions of pounds supposedly given to the EU on the NHS was a “mistake”.
    • 2016 August 10, Matthew Holehouse, “Is the ignorant Leave voter just a comforting myth?”, in The Telegraph[2]:
      Yet polling shows no ‘Bregret’ – a YouGov survey earlier this week showed 52% of voters think leaving was right and 48% wrong, mirroring the referendum result.
    • 2022 November 22, Mark Landler, “Buffeted by Economic Woes, U.K. Starts to Look at Brexit With ‘Bregret’”, in The New York Times[3], →ISSN:
      Brexit may be in the history books, but “Bregret,” as the British newspapers have called it, is back in the air.
    • 2022 December 23, Matthew Goodwin, “Brexit regrets? Britain has a few”, in The Spectator[4]:
      A creeping sense of Bregret is taking hold in Britain. A majority of Brits now say that the vote for Britain leaving the EU was a mistake.
    • 2023 January 31, Polly Toynbee, “Three years on from Brexit, all UK voters are left with is a bitter taste of Bregret”, in The Guardian[5], →ISSN:
      Three years on from Brexit, all UK voters are left with is a bitter taste of Bregret [title]