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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From catus (clear-sighted”, “intelligent”, “sagacious”, “wise).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Catius m (genitive Catiī or Catī); second declension

  1. a Roman deity, the protector of boys, whom he made intelligent
  2. a nomen — famously held by, amongst others:
    1. Quintus Catius, plebeian aedile in 210 BC and legate of the Roman Republic during the Second Punic War
    2. an Epicurean philosopher (fl. mid-1st C. BC) and author of the works De Rerum Natura, De Summo Bono, etc.
    3. Tiberius Catius Asconius Silius Italicus (AD 26–101), Roman consul and orator, author of the epic poem Punica
    4. Publius Catius Sabinus (fl. AD 3rd C.), consul in AD 216

DeclensionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular
nominative Catius
genitive Catiī
Catī1
dative Catiō
accusative Catium
ablative Catiō
vocative Catī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit