See also: eithne

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish Eithne.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnʲə/, /ˈɛhnʲə/

Proper nounEdit

Eithne f (genitive Eithne)

  1. A female given name from Old Irish
  2. (Irish mythology) The daughter of the Fomorian king Balor, wife of Cian and the mother of Lugh and Dealbhaeth, and the grandmother of Cú Chulainn and Fionn mac Cumhaill.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Ena, Enya, Etna, Ethna
  • Scots: Edna

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
Eithne nEithne hEithne not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

The name is from eithne (grain, kernel).[1]

Proper nounEdit

Eithne f

  1. A female given name

InflectionEdit

Feminine iā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative EithneL
Vocative EithneL
Accusative EithniN
Genitive Eithne
Dative EithniL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hogan, J., Hogan, E. (1900). Irish and Scottish Gaelic Names of Herbs, Plants, Trees, Etc. Ireland: M. H. Gille and son, p. vi

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish Eithne. Cognate with Old Norse Eðna.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Eithne

  1. A female given name from Old Irish
  2. (Irish mythology) The daughter of the Fomorian king Balor, wife of Cian and the mother of Lugh and Dealbhaeth, and the grandmother of Cú Chulainn and Fionn mac Cumhaill.

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
Eithne n-Eithne h-Eithne t-Eithne
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.