Phœnix

See also: phoenix, Phoenix, Phönix, and phœnix

EnglishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Phœnix

  1. Obsolete spelling of Phoenix
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii], page 13:
      A liuing Drolerie : now I will beleeue
      That there are Vnicornes : that in Arabia
      There is one Tree, the Phœnix throne, one Phœnix
      At this houre reigning there.
    • 1829, Algernon Herbert, Nimrod[1], volume IV, page 19:
      The Clementine epistle (which, however, maintains not only the History of Judith, but also a plurality of worlds separated from each other by the Oceanus, and in a manner both of minute detail and of solemn asseveration the Nimrodian and Pantheistic fable of the bird Phœnix) was perhaps concocted for such a purpose.