Rosalind

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *hrussą (horse) and *linþaz (soft; weak, tender), associated by medieval folk etymology with Latin rosa linda "lovely rose".

Proper nounEdit

Rosalind

  1. A female given name from the Germanic languages.
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
      : Act III, Scene II:
      Jaques. Rosalind is your love's name?
      Orlando. Yes, just.
      Jaques. I do not like her name.
      Orlando. There was no thought of pleasing you when she was christened.
  2. (astronomy) A moon of Uranus

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit