U.S. American

See also: US American

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

U.S. American (plural U.S. Americans)

  1. A person from the United States of America.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:American
    • 2004, Gwyneth Olofsson, When in Rome or Rio or Riyadh—: cultural Q&As for successful business behavior around the world, page 56:
      I've heard a Canadian say that citizens of the U.S. should really be called USians, but somehow I don't think it will catch on. Instead, if you talk about U.S. Americans, Canadians, Brazilians, and so on, nobody should be offended.
    • 2005, Pauline T. Newton, Transcultural women of late twentieth-century U.S. American literature, page 139:
      To Mai, Aunt Mary is another role model, one who is a native-born U.S. American who knows the country's tricks
    • 2007, Miss South Carolina Teen USA explains herself[1], today.com:
      Her answer, in its entirety, was: “I personally believe that U.S. Americans are unable to do so because, uhmmm, some people out there in our nation don't have maps and uh, I believe that our, I, education like such as, uh, South Africa, and uh, the Iraq, everywhere like such as, and I believe that they should, uhhh, our education over here in the U.S. should help the U.S., uh, should help South Africa, it should help the Iraq and the Asian countries so we will be able to build up our future, for us.”

Usage notesEdit

  • This term is rare compared to its common synonyms.[1] The usual neutral term used to refer to citizens of the United States is American, as imprecise as it may seem.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

U.S. American (not comparable)

  1. American
    • 1997, King-Kok Cheung, An interethnic companion to Asian American literature, page 177
      Her first novel ... is set in the U.S. American Midwest"
    • 2002, William B. Gudykunst & Bella Mody, Handbook of international and intercultural communication, page 5
      To date, much of ICC research has been conducted by U.S. American scholars
    • 2005, Alison Raymond Lanier & Jef C. Davis, Living in the U.S.A., (2005:9)
      Dominant U.S. American values", "most experts will agree that there is a dominant US American culture

ReferencesEdit