antœci

See also: antoeci

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin antoecī, from the Ancient Greek ἄντοικοι (antoikoi, dwellers opposite), from ἀντί (anti, opposite) + οἶκος (oikos, dwelling).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

antœci (plural only)

  1. The inhabitants at two points on the globe that share a longitude and for which the sum of their degrees of latitude equals zero.
    • 1622, Peter Heylin, Cosmographie in Four Bookes, Containing the Chorographie and Historie of the Whole World, introduction, page 20, column 1 (published in 1674)
      Antœci are such as dwell under the same Meridian and the same Latitude or Parallel equally distant from the Æquator; the one northward, the other Southward; the days in both places being of a length; but the Summer of the one being the others winter.
    • 1684, Thomas Burnet, The Theory of the Earth, book 2, page 174 (1697 edition)
      Antichthones…comprehend both the Antipodes and Antœci, or all beyond the Line[.]
    • 1796, Charles Hutton, A Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary, volume 1, page 121, column 1
      Antœci…have their noon, or midnight, or any other hour at the same time; but their seasons are contrary, being spring to the one, when it is autumn with the other.

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Last modified on 28 November 2013, at 15:50