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See also: Ardea

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Proto-Indo-European root suggested by Pokorny and common to Ancient Greek ἐρωδιός (erōdiós, heron) and Serbo-Croatian roda (stork)[1].

PronunciationEdit

 
ardea (a heron)

NounEdit

ardea f (genitive ardeae); first declension

  1. heron

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ardea ardeae
genitive ardeae ardeārum
dative ardeae ardeīs
accusative ardeam ardeās
ablative ardeā ardeīs
vocative ardea ardeae

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ardea in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ardea in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ardea” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • ardea in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ardea in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • ardea in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press
  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959), “arōd-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume I, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 68-69