ariolation

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From (the stem of) Latin ariolari, hariolari, from hariolus (soothsayer) +‎ -ation.

NounEdit

ariolation (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Soothsaying; prophecy.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, I.3:
      Thus the Priests of Elder time, have put upon them many incredible conceits, [...] deluding their apprehensions with Ariolation, South saying, and such oblick Idolatries [...].
    • 1685, Francis Rous, Seven Books of the Attick Antiquities, page 323:
      [] belongs to the technical part of divination, and may be reckoned for an Art, as well as any other sort of Ariolation.
    • 1842, The Colonial Magazine and Commercial-maritime Journal[1], page 60:
      The foolish system of ariolation is much practised by the primitive Papuas, previously to entering into any undertaking.