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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dhuwal balanda, from Makasar Balanda, from Malay Belanda, from Dutch Hollander.

NounEdit

balanda (plural balandas)

  1. (Australian Aboriginal, Arnhem Land) A white person, a European.
    • 1845, Ludwig Leichhardt, Journal of an Overland Expedition in Australia
      They knew the white people of Victoria, and called them Balanda, which is nothing more than ‘Hollanders’; a name used by the Malays, from whom they received it.
    • 1915, E. R. Masson, Untamed Territory
      The blacks rushed up to the house calling ‘Ballanda, Ballanda’—white man—and the Boss and Missus ran out.
    • 1943, W. E. Harney, Taboo
      On the natives’ side are [] fear of the Ballander-whiteman and the thought of losing their country.
    • 1978, J. Mirritji, My People’s Life
      Then I understood that this ‘balanda’ means people with skins like the white clay.
    • 1987, G. Francis, God’s Best Country
      That’s the only road back for them [] to be rid of all your partonising, domineering balanda ways.
    • 1989, B. Neidjie, Story About Feeling
      Balanda! If Aborigine e says something ... e want to stop im Balanda ... e might listen.
    • 1993, Canberra Times, 28 Jan.
      There are a lot of fans both balanda white and yolngu (east Arnhem Land Aborigines).

AnagramsEdit


DhuwalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Makasar Balanda, from Malay Belanda, from Dutch Hollander.

NounEdit

balanda

  1. a white person

ReferencesEdit

Lowe, Beulah (2004) Yolngu - English Dictionary, first edition, Arnhem Land: ARDS Inc.