English

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Noun

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bull-terrier (plural bull-terriers)

  1. Alternative spelling of bull terrier
    • 1881, Vero Shaw, “The Bull Terrier”, in Tony Read, editor, The Bull Terrier in Sport & Show: History & Anecdote, Read Country Books, published 2005, →ISBN:
      We ourselves have been applied to by a gentleman whose name is well known in the coursing world, for permission to cross some of his Greyhound bitches with the Bull-Terriers Tarquin and Sallust. The object of this was his desire to instill stamina and pluck into his breed, which he fancied was degenerating in these qualifications, and need not be gone into here. The result of the first Bull-Terrier cross, in each instance, was a large-framed, though light-boned and rather narrow-chested dog, with, for a Bull-Terrier, very snipy jaws, and possessing the peculiar action of the Greyhound in a marked degree. The difficulty of breeding out the last point alluded to struck us the moment we saw the animals move; and the original introducers of this blood into the Bull-Terrier – if there are such persons in existence – deserve considerable credit for their perseverance in their endeavours. However, not having the slightest desire to experimentalise in the matter, we are unable to give further information as regards the cross, so far as it affects the Bull-Terrier, beyond the fact that the dog puppies were at once destroyed by their owner, the females alone being retained by him for the purpose of working out his experiment.
    • 1930, Edward Cecil Ash, “The Bull-terrier”, in The Practical Dog Book: With Chapters on the Authentic History of All Varieties Hitherto Unpublished, and a Veterinary Guide and Dosage Section, and Information on Advertising and on Exporting to All Parts of the World, page 64:
      The Bull-terrier was made from the Bulldog towards the end of the eighteenth century, for the Bulldog was found too slow in the dog-fighting pits, although its strength and courage were greatly to its advantage.
    • 1936, Thomas W. Hogarth, “Chapter I. General Introduction”, in A Bull-terrier Notebook, published 2013, →ISBN:
      Long ago, in the days of bull-baiting, there existed dogs which resembled our present-day Bull-terriers, as can be verified by looking at old prints and at the illustrations in old books. These dogs were variously known as Bulldogs, Bulldog-terriers, and Bull-and-terriers, but it seems to the writer that it is from them that the modern Bulldog and the modern Bull-terrier are descended without much admixture of other blood.
    • 2001, Michael Foss, Out of India: A Raj Childhood, Michael O’Mara Books, →ISBN, page 112:
      I was confined to bed and shared my seclusion with the bull-terrier who volunteered to divide the bed with me.

French

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /byl.tɛ.ʁje/, /byl.te.ʁje/, /bul.tɛ.ʁje/, /bul.te.ʁje/, /bul.tɛ.ʁjœʁ/, /bul.te.ʁjœʁ/

Noun

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bull-terrier m (plural bull-terriers)

  1. bull terrier

Further reading

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