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EnglishEdit

 
Knight on caparisoned steed

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French caparaçon, from Old Spanish caparazón, from Old Provençal capairon.

NounEdit

caparison (plural caparisons)

  1. The often ornamental coverings for an animal, especially a horse or an elephant.
    • 1861, Charlotte Guest, The Mabinogion/The Dream of Rhonabwy:
      And the green of the caparison of the horse, and of his rider, was as green as the leaves of the fir-tree, and the yellow was as yellow as the blossom of the broom.
    • 2001, Walter A. Liedtke, Vermeer and the Delft School[1], page 520:
      That very year they received an order from Gustaf II Adolf of Sweden (1594-1632) for a large number of tapestries and four caparisons.
  2. Gay or rich clothing.
    • 1749, Tobias Smollett, The regicide:
      My heart groans beneath the gay caparison.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

caparison (third-person singular simple present caparisons, present participle caparisoning, simple past and past participle caparisoned)

  1. To dress up a horse or elephant with ornamental coverings.
    • 1593, Shakespeare, Richard III, Act 5, Scene 3.
      Come, bustle, bustle; caparison my horse

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit