Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English cle, clea, from Old English clēa (claw) (where the oblique forms > English claw).

NounEdit

cley (plural cleys)

  1. (obsolete) A claw.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 74:
      "But that more heavy Birds are otherwise provided for defence, namely either by Spurs that grow on their Legs, or by the strength and sharpness of some single cley in their Foot; as I have observed in the Cassoware or Emeu"
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English cley, from Old English clǣġ (clay).

NounEdit

cley (plural cleys)

  1. Alternative spelling of clay

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English clǣġ, from Proto-Germanic *klajjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gloh₁iyós.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cley (uncountable)

  1. clay, plaster, or earth like clay.
  2. Any earth or terrain; something of little value or import.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French cloie.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cley (plural cleys)

  1. A frame composed of planks crossed together.

ReferencesEdit