corbita

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin corbita (sailing freight ship).

NounEdit

corbita (plural corbita or corbitas)

  1. (historical, nautical) A two-masted merchant ship of Ancient Rome.
    • 1998, Eric Flint, ‎David Drake, In the Heart of Darkness:
      The corbita was heading directly back to Chalcedon, on the Asian side of the Straits.
    • 2007, Yossi Dotan, Watercraft on World Coins: Europe, 1800-2005, page 51:
      The reverse depicts a Roman corbita of the third century CE against the background of a map of the Mediterranean Sea from Tunisia and Sicily in the west to the eastern end of that sea and two lions in the foreground.
    • 2013, Coulsdon Writers, Back to the Writing, page 48:
      Two corbitas have arrived at the shipwright in Pompeii, back from Persia; on board are the fine silks and spices that I ordered.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

corbīta f (genitive corbītae); first declension

  1. A slow-sailing freight ship.

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative corbīta corbītae
Genitive corbītae corbītārum
Dative corbītae corbītīs
Accusative corbītam corbītās
Ablative corbītā corbītīs
Vocative corbīta corbītae

ReferencesEdit

  • corbitus” in Lewis & Short, A Latin Dictionary