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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cow +‎ flesh. Compare German Kuhfleisch (cow meat).

NounEdit

cowflesh (uncountable)

  1. The meat or flesh of a cow; beef.
    • 1964, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      A monstrous fine bit of cowflesh! I'll be sworn she has rendezvoused you. What, you dog? Have you a way with them?
    • 2005, James Andrew Crutchfield, Paul Andrew Hutton, The way west: true stories of the American frontier:
      At first Maud, so afraid for her husband and baby, was unable to eat, but within a few days she tore into burnt cowflesh like any soldadera.
    • 2007, Rick Bass, The Lives of Rocks:
      We ferried our stock in U-Haul trailers, and across the months, as we purchased more cowflesh from the Goat Man — meat vanishing into the ether again and again, as if into some quarkish void — we became familiar enough with Sloat and his daughter to learn that her name was Flozelle, and to visit with them about matters other than stock.

Usage notesEdit

  • Used strictly to refer to the meat or flesh of a cow; rarely as a culinary term or item.

See alsoEdit