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See also: créatúr

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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

creatur (plural creaturs)

  1. Obsolete spelling of creature
    • 1901, Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Uncalled[1]:
      I 'm mighty sorry to hear about the poor old creatur; but she 'd served you a long while."
    • 1861, George Eliot, Silas Marner[2]:
      But it was observed with some irritation in the village, that anybody but a "blind creatur" like Marner would have seen the man prowling about, for how came he to leave his tinder-box in the ditch close by, if he hadn't been lingering there?
    • 1799, George Eliot, Adam Bede[3]:
      "Frightened, very frightened, when they first brought her in; it was the first sight of the crowd and the judge, poor creatur.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French criature.

NounEdit

creatur

  1. Alternative form of creature

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French creator.

NounEdit

creatur

  1. Alternative form of creatour

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin creātor.

NounEdit

creatur m (oblique plural creaturs, nominative singular creaturs, nominative plural creatur)

  1. creator (one who creates)
    • 1958, The French Text of the Ancrene Riwle (based on the Cambridge manuscript, circa 1300)
      Kar quele compareison est entre le creatour e sa creature?
      For what comparison is there between the creator and his creature?

Usage notesEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit