EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Pyura stolonifera

Unknown; likely from a Pama-Nyungan language. English sources from the 19th century describe it as an Australian word.

NounEdit

 
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Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies cunjevoi (plural cunjevois or cunjevoi)

  1. (Australia) A coastal sea squirt, Pyura stolonifera, found in some parts of Australia and South Africa.
    • 1993, A. J. Underwood, M. G. Chapman, Seashores: A Beachcomber's Guide, page 39,
      All along our coast, cunjevoi are destroyed by fishermen, who use them for bait and, as a result, the other animals and plants that live in association with them are also killed.
    • 2006, Frank Prokop, Australian Fish Guide[1], page 275:
      The cunjevoi is an unusual animal, being born as a larvae with a notochord or primitive backbone, before becoming attached to the rocks and growing its brown leathery coat. Cunjevoi grow in colonies and form their own ecosystem around them, from the absolute bottom of the lowest tide to above the half mean tide on exposed rocks.
    • 2011, Colin Graham Smith, Shadows of War[2], page 31:
      There were three types of natural bait: ugari, worms and cunjevois.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Uncertain; likely from Bandjalang kanjibuy, or from another Pama-Nyungan language. Attested in English from the 19th century.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies cunjevoi (plural cunjevois or cunjevoi)

  1. A large flowering plant, Alocasia macrorrhizos, native to tropical islands from Asia to Australia.
    Synonyms: giant taro, giant alocasia
    • 1889, Joseph Henry Maiden, The Useful Native Plants of Australia (including Tasmania)[3], page 192:
      It is stated that the pain caused by the sting of this plant will be instantly relieved by the milky juice of of the lower part of the stem of Colocasia macorrhiza (“Cunjevoi” of the natives), being rubbed on the affected part.
    • 1997, John Griffin, Back Yard: A Gardening Life[4], page 62:
      Then we found the name when Tina bought a book about scented plants for Australian gardens. Our green lily is a cunjevoi, botanical name Alocasia macrorrhiza.