See also: Fecht

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *wextā (compare Welsh gwaith), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ- (to carry drive).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fecht f (genitive fechtae)

  1. turn, time

DeclensionEdit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative fechtL fechtL fechtaH
Vocative fechtL fechtL fechtaH
Accusative fechtN fechtL fechtaH
Genitive fechtaeH fechtL fechtN
Dative fechtL fechtaib fechtaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: feacht
  • Scottish Gaelic: feachd

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fecht ḟecht fecht
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [fɛçt], [feːçt]
  • (South Scots) IPA(key): [faeçt]

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fighten, from Old English feohtan, from Proto-West Germanic *fehtan, from Proto-Germanic *fehtaną.

VerbEdit

fecht (third-person singular present fechts, present participle fechtin, past fechtit or focht or feucht, past participle fechtit or fochten or feuchten)

  1. to fight
  2. to struggle in the battle of life against misfortune, poverty, etc.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English feght, from Old English feoht, from the verb.

NounEdit

fecht (plural fechts)

  1. fight, struggle, battle
  2. exertion, pugnacity