FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French gauppe (a loose woman), from Old French *gaupe,*gualpe, of Germanic origin; cognate with Alemannic German Buschwalpe (loose woman, procuress), Bavarian Walpe (foolish woman).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gaupe f (plural gaupes)

  1. (archaic) trull, trollop

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gaupa; compare with Faroese geypa (lynx) and Icelandic gaupa (lynx).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡæʉ.pe/, [ˈɡæʉ̯ː.pə]

NounEdit

gaupe f or m (definite singular gaupa or gaupen, indefinite plural gauper, definite plural gaupene)

  1. lynx, wildcat; Lynx lynx

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gaupa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gaupe f (definite singular gaupa, indefinite plural gauper, definite plural gaupene)

  1. a lynx, a wild cat of the genus Lynx
  2. a Eurasian lynx, Lynx lynx
    • 1866, Aasmund Olavsson Vinje, "'Norsk Landmandsbog for 1866' av A. Rosing":
      I England sjaa vi dette best, der den store Arbeidsflokken snart sagt aldri seer Kjøt paa Bordet sit, medan Stormannen eller Aristokraten eter seg mest ihel paa Kjøt. Og tidt stryker og Livet med. Det er Ørn og Falk og Gaupe o.s.v. i Dyresamfundet.
      In England we see this most clearly, where the large heap of workers almost never see meat on their table, whereas the big man or aristocrat almost eats himself too death on meat. And often it does claim their life. That is like the eagle and falcon and lynx, and so on, in animal society.

ReferencesEdit


PlautdietschEdit

VerbEdit

gaupe

  1. to gape, to gasp for air