See also: gemütlich


Alternative formsEdit


From German gemütlich ‎(comfortable, cozy, genial, pleasant), from Middle High German gemüetlich, from gemüet ‎(mind, mentality) + -lich ‎(-ly), equivalent to Gemüt ‎(mind, soul) +‎ -lich ‎(-ly). More at mood, -ly.



gemutlich ‎(comparative more gemutlich, superlative most gemutlich)

  1. Comfortable, cozy, snug, pleasant.
    1964, Nation, Issues 135-159[1], Digitized edition, Nation Review, published 2011, page 98:
    However, to any Nation readers who think that gemutlich is not “a living word" I am glad to be able to inform them that Harold Nicolson in his volume Good Behaviour has a whole chapter on Gemutlichkeit, ...
    1973, Edward G. Robinson, Leonard Spigelgass, All My Yesterdays, Digitized edition, Autobiography, Hawthorn Books, published 2008, page 80:
    …and there's always a buzz of conversation and somebody's playing the piano, and it's gemutlich. / To one of those particularly gemutlich evenings I invited a stockbroker who lived in Guilford, and he arrived with a lady named Gladys Lloyd.
  2. Friendly, genial, cheerful, easy-going.
    1997 January 26, Judith Miller, “FILM: Making Money Abroad, And Also a Few Enemies”, New York Times, New York:
    The censors cut one in which Judd Hirsch, who plays Mr. Goldblum's gemutlich, Yiddish-spouting father,

Related termsEdit