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See also: i land and i-land

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English iland, yland, from Old English īġland, īeġland (island). Cognate with Scots iland, yland (island). More at island.

NounEdit

iland (plural ilands)

  1. Obsolete form of island.
    • 1624, John Donne, “17. Meditation”, in Deuotions upon Emergent Occasions, and Seuerall Steps in My Sicknes: [], London: Printed by A[ugustine] M[atthews] for Thomas Iones, OCLC 55189476, lines 2–3; republished as Geoffrey Keynes, John Sparrow, editor, Devotions upon Emergent Occasions: [], Cambridge: At the University Press, 1923, OCLC 459265555, page 98:
      No man is an Iland, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; []
    • 1790, Tobias George Smollett, The Critical review, or, Annals of literature:
      This vast iland seems to have been first peopled by Fins and Laplanders, whom Ihre thinks the first inhabitants of the whole.
    • 1858, Thomas Wright, La mort d'Arthure:
      [] and there came against him king Marsill, that had in gift an iland of sir Galahalt the haute prince, and this iland had the name Pomitaine.

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