incantatory

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incantatory (comparative more incantatory, superlative most incantatory)

  1. Constituting, employing, dealing with, or suitable for use in incantation.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, London: Edw. Dod & Nath. Ekins, 1650, Book I, Chapter 3, p. 9,[1]
      Fortune tellers, Juglers, Geomancers, and the like incantatory impostors, though commonly men of inferiour rank, and from whom without illumination they can expect no more then from themselves, do daily and professedly delude them.
    • 1888, Lafcadio Hearn, “A Midsummer Trip to the West Indies,” Second Paper, XIII, Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, Volume 77, Number 459, August 1888, p. 332,[2]
      A trained musician might protest against so strange a manner of ringing the chimes; but he could not possibly deny that it has impressiveness: it is wild, barbaric, incantatory—it is a monstrous musical conjuration.
    • 1912, Arnold Bennett, “The Widow of the Balcony” in The Matador of the Five Towns, and Other Stories, London: Methuen, p. 169,[3]
      Thenceforward the witch without a name held continuous receptions in the boudoir, and the boudoir gradually grew into an abode of mystery and strangeness, hypnotizing the entire house. People went thither; people came back; and those who had not been pictured to themselves something very incantatory, and little by little they made up their minds to go.