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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

incredulous +‎ -ness

NounEdit

incredulousness (uncountable)

  1. (rare) Incredulity; the state of being skeptical or in disbelief.

QuotationsEdit

1848 1986 2003
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1848, F. Ayrton, "Observations on M. d'Abbadie's Account of his Discovery of the Sources of the White Nile," Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London, vol. 18, p. 48,
    Perhaps, one ought not to be surprised that a sudden announcement of success, even though professing to be founded upon the positive testimony of personal observation, should be met by incredulousness.
  • 1986, "Noted With Pleasure," New York Times, 11 May, p. BR47,
    Tim O'Brien, who wrote a novel about war, has captured here the sense of incredulousness and theatricality he had while being shot at in Vietnam.
  • 2003, Fletcher Winston, "What if Milgram Controlled Student Grades?", Teaching Sociology, vol. 31 no 2, (Apr), p. 222,
    The class responds with grumbling, incredulousness, and the inevitable declaration of disbelief and resistance; "Are you serious?"

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