mighteous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From might +‎ -eous, modelled after righteous, equivalent to might +‎ -wise.

AdjectiveEdit

mighteous (comparative more mighteous, superlative most mighteous)

  1. Possessing might; mighty; powerful; mightily righteous.
    • 1916, Baynard Rush Hall, James Albert Woodburn, The new purchase
      Still, it was quite edifying to witness the anxious bustling, and to hear the learned remarks of our dwarf Esculapius; who among other things, was constrained to acknowledge that — "unassisted nature had yet mighteous potential efficacity of her own intrinsic internal force, [...]
    • 1969, Black World/Negro Digest, Oct 1969
      We used to sleep the sleep of the mighteous, never reaching for d'epistle tucked, unfriared, under the brillo's ear.
    • (Can we date this quote by Charles Baudelaire and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?), The Flowers of Evil
      The sea is thy mirror, thou regardest thy soul In its mighteous waves that unendingly roll, And thy spirit is yet not a chasm less drear.
    • 1998, G. N. Das, Shri Rama: the man and his mission
      In the gods and humans, demons and birds I have my followers everywhere obedient to me; Khara and Dushana, the demons, are as mighteous as I myself.

AnagramsEdit