Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From nonus (ninth). As a day, from the Latin practice of treating most recurring calendrical days as plurals.[1][2]

NumeralEdit

nōnae

  1. nominative feminine plural of nōnus
  2. genitive feminine singular of nōnus
  3. dative feminine singular of nōnus
  4. vocative feminine plural of nōnus

NounEdit

nōnae f pl (genitive nōnārum); first declension (plural only)

  1. The nones.

Alternative formsEdit

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Plural
nominative nōnae
genitive nōnārum
dative nōnīs
accusative nōnās
ablative nōnīs
vocative nōnae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ Kennedy, Benjamin Hall, The Public School Latin Grammar (1879), p. 126.
  2. ^ Michels, Agnes Kirsopp, Calendar of the Roman Republic (2015), p. 19.

BibliographyEdit

  • nonae in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nonae in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin