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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English opake, from Latin opacus (shaded, shady, dark) (of unknown origin), later reinforced from Middle French opaque.

AdjectiveEdit

opake (comparative more opake, superlative most opake)

  1. Alternative form of opaque
    • 1969, Douglas McKie, (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1] (Science), Digitized edition, Harvard Univ. Press, published 2007, page 187:
      The artificial marble made here is made in the common way with Gypsum Lime and other materials and the artist who is an Italian calls himself a Scagliolist (Scagliola being their name for Gypsum or works in Gypsum) he imitates some of the opake and coloured marbles ...

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

opake

  1. Inflected form of opaak

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

opake

  1. inflected form of opak

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin opacus (shaded, shady, dark) (of unknown origin), later reinforced from Middle French opaque.

AdjectiveEdit

opake (comparative opaker, superlative opakest)

  1. dark, shaded, unlit
    • c 1440, Palladius
      Summe haue hem grene ypuld, and stoon & all They honge hem vp in place opake and drie.