permansion

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin permansio, from the participle stem of permanere.

NounEdit

permansion (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, rare) Permanence.
    • 1646, Browne, Sir Thomas, “Of Hares”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica, book III, chapter 17:
      [] from female unto male, from male to female again, and so in a circle to both, without a permansion in either.
    • 1659, Pearson, Bishop John, “The Resurrection of the Body”, in An Exposition of the Creed, article 11:
      And can we think that such material and mortal, that such inunderstanding souls, should by God and Nature be furnished with bodies of so long permansion, and that our spirits should joined unto flesh so subject of corruption, so suddenly dissolvible, were it not that they lived but once []

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