Massachusettsian

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

NounEdit

Massachusettsian (plural Massachusettsians)

  1. (dated) A native or resident of Massachusetts.
    • 1802 [1962], John Adams, L.H. Butterfield editor, Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, volume 3, page 336:
      That he was a Virginian and I a Massachusettsian.
    • 1869 January, Mayne Reid, “Trifles”, Onward, G.W. Carleton, page 82: 
      A young Massachusettsian (is this correct orthography?), by name Nathaniel II. Bishop, a mere lad of seventeen, who, prompted by a love of nature, starts off from his New England home, reaches the La Plata River, and coolly "walks" to Valparaiso, across pampa and cordillera, a distance of more than a thousand miles !
    • 1916, Charles Villiers Stanford, A History of Music, The Macmillan Company, page 324:
      Chadwick (54), though a Massachusettsian by birth, residence, and position is not so by preordination. He has a directness of thought, a humour, and a power of seeing himself as others see him that smack more of London or Paris than of Boston.
    • 1997, Maggie Montesinos Sale, The Slumbering Volcano: American Slave Ship Revolts and the Production of Rebellious Masculinity, Duke University Press, ISBN 9780822319924, page 131:
      Much to the chagrin of many a Massachusettsian, on January 29, 1 842, Secretary of State Daniel Webster dispatched directions to the US ambassador to Great Britain in support of Calhoun's resolutions.
    • 2003, John P. Diggins, John Adams, Macmillan, ISBN 9780805069372, page 42-3:
      The minor appointments were the Virginian Edmund Randolph as attorney general and the Massachusettsian Henry Knox as secretary of war.

HypernymsEdit

Last modified on 15 March 2014, at 23:14