Talk:bon appétit

Return to "bon appétit" page.

Japanese translationEdit

Itadakimasu is used by those eating, to express gratitute, while Bon appétit is to wish enjoyment to those eating. Is there a more appropriate Japanese phrase? --Vladisdead 12:25, 4 Oct 2004 (UTC)

Yes it's not exactly the same so that fact is worth noting, but it is what is usually given as a translation. In its own def it should not be defined as "bon appétit" though it should appear under the Translation heading. — Hippietrail 12:56, 4 Oct 2004 (UTC)
Fixed, although belated. --Anatoli (обсудить) 03:09, 22 February 2012 (UTC)

Etymology timeline...Edit

It would be nice if the Etymology section mentioned when the phrase migrated into the English language... was it during the Norman invasion?? Georgian or Victorian era??

  • Also it would be interesting to know if it was adopted before the French started dropping the "t" at the end. Shadyaubergine 01:11, 22 February 2012 (UTC)
It was borrowed during the 19th century, well after the French started dropping the t. People often pronounce the t in English because it is written there, and in English we usually don’t drop letters at the end. It’s a spelling pronunciation, a holdover of the speak-as-you-spell movement. —Stephen (Talk) 03:05, 22 February 2012 (UTC)

How is this pronounced in English?Edit

Is last 't' pronounced in English? Or is original French pronunciation used?

From experience, both. Mglovesfun (talk) 09:00, 24 July 2012 (UTC)
Last modified on 24 July 2012, at 09:00