Last modified on 28 May 2014, at 23:20

Timonian

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Timon +‎ -ian, from the 5th-century BC person Timon of Athens (as described by Plutarch, Lucian, Aristophanes), possibly by way of William Shakespeare's play Timon of Athens (c. 1607). Used by poet John Langhorne in his translation of Plutarch's Lives (1777).

AdjectiveEdit

Timonian (comparative more Timonian, superlative most Timonian)

  1. Of a form of bitter misanthropy relating to Timonism, like Timon of Athens.
    • 1983, M. R. Stopper, in Phronesis:[1]
      [About Timon's account of Pyrrho's views.] The second Timonian passage is usually taken to come from his prose work, Python.
    • 2001, Jonathan Barnes, in Mind:[2]
      Aristocles is not citing Timon—and how near he keeps to any Timonian text we cannot judge.
QuotationsEdit
  • 1770, John Langhorne; Langhorne, William, Parallel Lives, E. and C. Dilly, translation of original by Plutarch, page 457:
    None of these things, however, disturbed him; for, at once abandoning his hopes and his cares, he left his Timonian retreat, and returned to Alexandria;
  • 1939 June 13, “Dr. Ezra Pound”, The New York Times, page 22:
    Yesterday Hamilton College doctored Ezra Loomis Pound, the Idaho lad who was graduated from it in 1905. In his habitual Timonian mood he has, time and time again, taken the hide off American professors.
  • 1962, Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire: A Novel, New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, Index (written by the author, part of the narrative) (Repr. Vintage Books, 1989, ISBN 0-679-72342-0.), page 308:
    Kinbote, Charles, Dr., [...]; his modesty, 34; his having no library in his Timonian cave, 39; his belief in his having inspired S, 42;
  • 2002, Lawrence I. Berkove, A Prescription for Adversity: The Moral Art of Ambrose Bierce, Ohio State University Press, ISBN 978-0814208946, OL 11352634M, Introduction, page xiv:
    Like Swift, whom he admired and imitated and with whom he had much in common, Bierce was a man who hated boldly and well and yet was not a Timonian misanthrope.
  • For more examples of usage of this term, see the citations page.
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Etymology 2Edit

Timon +‎ -an, from a 3rd-century BC disciple of Pyrrho, Skeptic philosopher and satirist Timon of Phlius (c. 320 – c. 230 BC).

AdjectiveEdit

Timonian (comparative more Timonian, superlative most Timonian)

  1. Of or relating to Skeptic philosopher Timon of Phlius, his life, works, style, or ideas.
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Etymology 3Edit

From the name of French priest Joseph-Marie Timon-David (1823-1891) and the Sacred Heart congregation he founded in 1864.

AdjectiveEdit

Timonian (comparative more Timonian, superlative most Timonian)

  1. Of or relating to the French Catholic Sacred Heart congregation founded by Joseph-Marie Timon-David.
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NounEdit

Timonian (plural Timonians)

  1. A member of the French Catholic Sacred Heart congregation founded by Joseph-Marie Timon-David.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ M. R. Stopper, "Schizzi Pirroniani [review of Lo scetticismo antico by Gabriele Giannantoni]" (JSTOR 4182180), Critical Notice in Phronesis, Vol. 28, No. 3 (1983), p. 265-297, endnote 36, at Google Scholar.
  2. ^ Jonathan Barnes, "Pyrrho--his Antecedents and his Legacy. Richard Bett [review of the book from Oxford University Press, 2000]" (doi:10.1093/mind/110.440.1043), in Mind (ISSN 0026-4423, e-ISSN 1460-2113), Vol. 110, Nr. 440, p. 1043-1046, at Google Scholar.