abulia

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From New Latin, from Ancient Greek ἀβουλία (aboulia, irresolution), from ἀ- (a-, without) + βουλή (boulē, will).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abulia (plural abulias)

  1. (psychiatry) Absence of willpower or decisiveness, especially as a symptom of mental illness. [First attested in the mid 19th century.][2]
    • 1969, John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman:
      He felt without volition, plunged into a state of aboulia.

TranslationsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1971 [1969], Morris, William editor, The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, New York, NY: American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc., ISBN 0-395-09066-0, page 6:
  2. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 7

ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

NounEdit

abulia f (plural abulie)

  1. (medicine) aboulia
  2. apathy, idleness

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 14:17