Last modified on 19 September 2013, at 13:29

agbada

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Yoruba agbádá

NounEdit

agbada (plural agbada or agbadas)

  1. A long, flowing robe with wide sleeves worn by men in some parts of West Africa, often decorated with embroidery.
    • 1974, Oliver Jackson, Saw the House in Half, p. 90
      A big man wearing an agbada with gold thread embroidery at the neck and sleeves came up to him holding a glass of champagne between his thumb and forefinger.
    • 2008, Wendy Griswold, Cultures and Societies in a Changing World, p. 102
      If African leaders of the 1940s and 1950s wore suits from Savile Row and Paris as they negotiated with representatives of the colonial powers, the next generation of African leaders wore agbadas and dashikis.
    • 2010, Elizabeth Evans, Sanakhou, p. 182
      Over his crisp, white pantaloons and sleeveless tunic he had put on an agbada in his mother's favorite color, yellow, with simple white embroidery that ran around the hem, sleeves and the opening at the neck.